Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

September 25 2014

tinu-qin

September 22 2014

tinu-qin
Reposted fromemcix emcix viaekelias ekelias
7799 55d6

the-black-mrrogers:

insipidrainbow:

chadleymacguff:

*mortal combat voice* FINISH HIM

SHE USED THE FORCE OF HIM PULLING HER TO HELP PROPEL HERSELF ONTO HIM. THAT’S SOME TACTICAL THINKING DAMN. 

she beat his ass with flip flops on thats some serious skill

Reposted fromxuu xuu viadanielbohrer danielbohrer
5633 f979

tomhiddlesismyspiritanimal:

anyankaleigh:

baddiebey:

image

this is like my fave joke

okay that shit was good.

Reposted fromcumberkruemel cumberkruemel viapulegon pulegon
tinu-qin
Inside jokes in »Canterlot Wedding«, confirmed by the composer (and I can confirm the Authentic/Deceptive Cadence thingy ^^)
(via @fenhl, @l3viathan)
Reposted fromdanielbohrer danielbohrer

September 17 2014

tinu-qin
7034 2c59
Reposted fromRemulaner Remulaner viafraufledermaus fraufledermaus

September 15 2014

tinu-qin

“I am sorry baby human! Do not cry anymore! I shall bring you more toys!” (via souada.tumblr.com)

Reposted frommr-absentia mr-absentia viaCarridwen Carridwen
tinu-qin
7957 1570 500
Reposted fromNeutrum Neutrum viaCarridwen Carridwen
tinu-qin
4174 b330 500
Reposted fromsamvi samvi viaCarridwen Carridwen
When men imagine a female uprising, they imagine a world in which women rule men as men have ruled women.

Sally Kempton

It’s been apparent to me for a while that most men can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they can imagine is having the existing power structure inverted.

I cannot decide whether this shows how unimaginative they are, or shows how aware they must be of what they do in order to so deeply fear having it turned on them. (via lepetitmortpourmoi)

"Most men can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they can imagine is having the existing power structure inverted." (via misandry-mermaid)

Same thing with race

(via californiajaguar)
Reposted fromekelias ekelias
tinu-qin

September 09 2014

Play fullscreen

phylhrmnix:

YES YES YES YES YES

This is very, very worth your while. A ”pendulum wave” is a series of pendulums started coincidentally, calibrated to return to their initial state after some known interval of time (here, 160 seconds). In the process, they visualize the major mathematical landmarks of simple oscillation in a dramatic, downright beautiful way.

PLUS THIS ONE MAKES NOISE YOU GUYS

(For something of this size, outdoors, it’s really well-calibrated, and near enough to perfect to show what it needs to :) )

Reposted fromwendel wendel viadanielbohrer danielbohrer

September 04 2014

tinu-qin

21 GIFs That Explain Mathematical Concepts

var imagebase='file://D:/Program Files (x86)/FeedReader/'; 21 GIFs That Explain Mathematical Concepts 15:55 27.08.2014, Maxx, amazing, World Of Technology “Let's face it; by and large math is not easy, but that's what makes it so rewarding when you conquer a problem, and reach new heights of understanding.”

Danica McKellar

As we usher in the start of a new school year, it’s time to hit the ground running in your classes! Math can be pretty tough, but since it is the language in which scientists interpret the Universe, there’s really no getting around learning it. Check out these gifs that will help you visualize some tricky aspects of math, so you can dominate your exams this year.

Ellipse:
Solving Pascal triangles:
Use FOIL to easily multiply binomials:

Here’s how you solve logarithms:

Use this trick so you don’t get mixed up when doing matrix transpositions:

What the Pythagorean Theorem is really trying to show you:

Exterior angles of polygons will ALWAYS add up to 360 degrees:

If you’re studying trig, you better get pretty comfortable with circles. Check out this visualization that shows what you’re really looking at when you deal with pi:


If an arc of a circle is the same length as its radius, the resulting angle is one radian:

Visualizing sine (red) on the Y axis and cosine (blue) on the X axis. The relative position of the circle is shown in black:
This shows the same thing, but a bit more simply:

Here’s how sine and cosine apply to triangles:

Cosine is the derivative of sine:

Tangent lines:

Flipped on its side, the shape begins to make more sense:
Converting a function from Cartesian to Polar coordinates:

Drawing a parabola:

The Riemann sum is the approximate area under a curve:

Hyperbola:

Translating that into 3D, you get a hyperboloid. Believe it or not, it’s made with completely straight lines:

Seriously. You can even make it do this:


Reposted fromlockes lockes viadanielbohrer danielbohrer
tinu-qin

Who says I'm always negative? Leaving aside the substantial evidence in the form of blog posts, angry Twitter rants and the rages that overtake me when my football team isn't winning, I assure you I'm capable of being reasonable, constructive and even -- make sure you're sitting down for this -- pleasant.

You may be under the impression that I hate men. This is not the case. Men are fine! (Some men are really fine, if you get what I'm saying, which I'm sure you do, because that had all the subtlety of a large-scale trainwreck.) What makes me mad is misogyny. What makes me madder is the appropriation of the feminist movement by men who either don't know what they're doing or are deliberately trying to profit from it.

Let's say you're the first kind -- well-meaning, but just not that well-educated about what being a feminist entails. You've come to the right place! I'm going to stop yelling for long enough to tell you ten things you can do in order to be a better feminist, a better ally and -- let's face it -- a better person.

1. Leave your baggage at the door.

I know you have a bunch of preconceptions about what feminism is and what your place in the grand scheme of things might be. That's perfectly natural -- all of us have preconceived notions about the world based on our prior experiences. But I'm gonna need you to drop all of that when you walk into feminist spaces.

Feminism is a movement that is largely based on female lived experiences. If you're not a woman, you can empathize, but you simply can't say you know what we've been through. And that's fine! There are plenty of causes I support even though I'm not directly linked to them or affected by them. Nobody's saying you can't be a feminist. What we're saying is that you need to follow our lead on this one, because this movement is about the way power structures affect our lives in ways that you may not even be able to perceive from where you're standing.

Come in with an open mind and be ready to learn, and you'll find yourself not only having your eyes opened to a whole new world, but being much more capable of understanding and processing what you'll see and hear.

2. Be prepared to do a lot of listening.

You probably have a lot of insights that you want to share. You want to tell us why men act the way they do and how you think we can change that behavior. And there's room for that in feminism... to an extent. But for the most part, what we need men to do is just to listen.

I want you to think about all the women who are denied a chance to speak by men around the world -- women who are barred from obtaining an education, women who are subjected to genital mutilation, women who aren't allowed to work, women who are survivors of sexual abuse, women of color, trans and queer women, sex workers. Don't they deserve a chance to be heard? Wouldn't you like to be the person to give them that chance?

It seems simple, but it's so, so important. A huge part of being an ally is being prepared to listen to our stories -- and there are a lot of them. A lot. You might want to get out a notepad and start taking notes. There may or may not be a test later.

We have been silenced for so long. Let us speak. Please.

3. Don't expect an automatic welcome.

You're a stand-up guy, right? Here you are, ready to roll up your sleeves and get your hands dirty fighting the good fight. If only more guys were like you!

The thing is -- and don't take this personally -- we've seen a lot of guys who looked just like you, talked just like you, were just as enthusiastic as you... who proceeded to talk over us, silence us, demean us or use our movement to profit off us. Can you blame us for being a little wary? Can you blame us for being suspicious when men try to enter our spaces, no matter how seemingly good their intentions?

Under the guise of "feminism," men have sexually harassed and raped women whose trust they'd gained, used their positions of influence to bully and silence women (Hugo Schwyzer, anyone?) and even gotten away with murder. No, you probably won't do any of those things-- but we can't be sure of that. So be prepared for a little hostility. We've had to learn the hard way to be suspicious of strangers bearing gifts. If you work hard and do right by us, we'll accept you in time.

4. Don't expect special treatment.

This is something a lot of men struggle with, and with good reason -- they've come from a position of total privilege, where their ideas and opinions are automatically given weight by virtue of their gender. You might not even realize this, but your maleness gives you huge advantages out there in the big, wide world.

If you want to be a feminist, you have to be prepared to give that up.

It's hard. I know how hard it is, because there are times when I've had to do it myself. Sometimes you'll find yourself feeling offended or affronted. You'll find yourself wondering why you even bother if people aren't going to acknowledge your efforts. That's your privilege talking, and you need to learn to set all of that aside if you want to do this right.

Welcome to the new world, friend. Enjoy equality!

5. Don't talk over us.

A lot of men take offense to this, but you need to learn to bite your tongue.

This is our movement. We're glad that you're along for the ride, but you have to learn that you don't get to take center stage. That space is reserved for women with real lived experiences to share. If you find yourself with the urge to talk over a woman who's sharing her story, just...don't. There is no easier way of riling up a feminist than by trying to tell her story for her, or assuming you know it better than she does. I promise you, no matter what the situation is, you don't. You haven't lived her life, you haven't seen what she's seen or felt what she's felt, and there is no way that you, a man, can possibly understand 100 percent of what it's like to be a woman.

I'm not saying you're not allowed to speak. I'm saying you have to wait your turn. In feminist spaces, a woman's lived experience takes precedence over your insights as a man. We're kind of natural experts in this field, you know? Just let us talk.

6. Don't stay silent when you see sexism in action.

Your buddies all tell rape jokes. They make you feel awkward, but you don't say anything because you don't want to be That Guy -- the one who kills the buzz, the one who's the PC Police all the time. You smile awkwardly when your bestie tells women to make him a sandwich even though you think it's not really that funny, and you let yourself be drawn into discussions that degrade women even though that's not your intent.

Yeah, that needs to stop.

If you want to do something concrete -- and I'm guessing you do -- this is the best place to start. Call out sexism when you see it. Tell your buddies those rape jokes aren't cool. Roll your eyes at your friend's sandwich jokes and tell him he's being an ass. When you witness street harassment, step up and say something. Be the guy who doesn't let other guys talk shit about women behind their backs. Be the guy who never lets "she was asking for it" stand.

I can't stress enough how important this is. Your intent means nothing if you don't back it up. Help us out here, dude. Use your voice for good.

7. Never, ever mansplain to us.

You're talking to a sex worker who's sharing her story of what working life is like for her where she lives. You feel like she's getting some of the details wrong -- maybe you've understood a certain law differently from her, or you find it hard to believe the police are so unsupportive. You tell her you don't think that's the way things are and proceed to explain reality the way you've experienced it.

That's mansplaining, and you shouldn't be surprised if that sex worker gets more than a little testy when you do it.

I know some of you do this unintentionally, but you need to catch yourself doing it and stop. Mansplaining derails discussions, trivializes the lived experiences of women and is just outright rude. Do you honestly think you know more about the reality of sex work than the girl who was talking to you about it? She lives it. You've just seen a documentary on TV. She doesn't need you to explain to her what her life is really like.

8. Don't tell us to calm down.

I think I've kept my tone fairly light thus far, but most of the time, if I'm talking about social justice, I'm pretty goddamn angry. This is a natural response to being discriminated against for being a woman for my entire life. I know that anger can be very confronting and a little off-putting, but there are reasons for that, those reasons being that a) the reality of existence as a female in our society is pretty confronting, and b) being faced with brutal, unpleasant truths is naturally very off-putting.

You might be tempted to say something about catching more flies with honey. The thing is, we're not trying to catch flies. We're trying to change the world, and you don't change the world with niceness (believe me, even Gandhi was a manipulative old bastard -- no activist is ever as serene as they may seem). As my dad was fond of saying: the reasonable man adapts himself to the world, whereas the unreasonable man adapts the world to himself; therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man.

We're the unreasonable women, and we're adapting the world to ourselves, because that's how you get things done. Telling us to calm down is tone policing, and if you'd like an explanation of why that's a terrible thing to do, click that link above and prepare to feel like you've just been slapped in the face repeatedly by several angry women all at once.

Or you could take my word for it and just let us be mad when we need to be. Trust me, it works better this way.

9. Amplify and empathize.

If you find a great blog post about sex worker rights in India, share it with your friends. If someone you know is sharing their experiences as a trans woman going through the medical system, retweet the hell out of her and encourage people to follow her. If, say, a fiery young Muslim woman you know writes a great blog post that you find really useful, spread it around to everyone else you think might find it useful too. Allies are great amplifiers -- they help spread our message so that it reaches audiences it might not have reached otherwise. That's a valuable thing.

And while you might not understand what we've gone through or what it's like to be us, when we share our experiences, listen empathetically. It means a lot to know that even though you might not know how we feel, you care that we've felt pain and it pains you, too. Be there for us. March with us. Listen to us vent. Come along to our seminars and tell all your friends to come too. Be a part of the creation of safe spaces for us because you genuinely care about our safety and well-being. Be the great person I'm sure you're capable of being. This is what allies do.

10. Don't give up when it gets hard.

Not if -- when. Because it will get hard, I promise. You will be forced to re-evaluate almost everything you've ever known about women and feminism. You will learn about experiences that are totally alien to you. You will probably be taken down a peg or two when you mess up. (Don't worry, we all mess up, and we all eat crow afterwards. It's fine, the internet has a pretty short memory.) And once you start doing this, you can't just stop, because even if you want to, you won't be able to shut your eyes to reality once you've had them opened.

This is a war so many of us wish we didn't have to wage. I can't tell you how tiring it is to spend day after day after day having to fight for my fundamental human rights. It's draining and exhausting and, to be quite honest, pretty damn demoralizing sometimes. You won't experience all of that, but you'll experience enough to make you wonder why you got into this in the first place.

Here's why: because equality matters. This stuff isn't some kind of abstract academic debate. This is about the way 50 percent of the world is forced to live because of a system that regards them as second-class citizens. Isn't that wrong? Isn't that hateful? Shouldn't it change?

And wouldn't you rather be one of the people helping to change it?

Feminism is vital work. It's hard, it's messy, and it's often thankless, but it's also very, very necessary. It's necessary for all the reasons I've stated and re-stated on this blog dozens of times. It's necessary because when we don't do this work, people don't just suffer -- they die because of our inaction. And it's not just women who are affected -- it's every man ever criticized for choosing to stay at home with his kids, every man who likes crafts more than sports, every man who's ever cried in public, every man who isn't arrogant and self-assured enough to bluff his way through life as though he owns everything he sees. You might even be one of those men. If you are, this isn't just about us, this is about you. This is about a world in which we can all be free to express our genders however we like without facing judgement or discrimination for simply being who we are.

I want to live to see that world. I'm sure you do, too. So welcome aboard, friend. I'm glad you've decided to join us. Let's save the world together.

10 Ways to Be a Better Male Feminist | Aaminah Khan
Reposted fromlordminx lordminx viadanielbohrer danielbohrer

September 03 2014

tinu-qin
the reason male comic book fans work themselves into a frenzied rage over “fake geek girls" is because they think they can’t get a girlfriend because of their love for comic books (a.k.a nerdiness). if they accept that geek girls genuinely love comic books, then they’re left with the cold harsh reality that it’s not their nerdiness that makes them unattractive to women, but the fact that they are misogynistic condescending dickbags who need to be avoided AT ALL COSTS
girls who run with wolves (the reason male comic book fans work themselves...)
Reposted fromlordminx lordminx vialotterleben lotterleben

September 02 2014

tinu-qin
2198 22ca
Reposted fromGIFer GIFer viaWellentechniker Wellentechniker

September 01 2014

tinu-qin
6054 300b
Reposted fromourhogwarts ourhogwarts viaCarridwen Carridwen
tinu-qin

August 30 2014

tinu-qin
5522 49f9 500
Reposted fromartois artois viaFreXxX FreXxX
tinu-qin
Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl